?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

A Changed Country




vBulletin counter


TqiorT5

I have been at a loss as to what to say about yesterday’s tragic shooting in Ottawa. The shooting and death of the young soldier Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, while he stood guard at the War Memorial, will change Canada forever.


The cartoon above is by Bruce MacKinnon who is well known for his powerful art, it more than anything else hit me in a number of ways. I grieve for this young man’s family, and for the Canada of two days ago.

Comments

lab_jazz
Oct. 25th, 2014 10:07 am (UTC)
and youth who have never felt they fit in anywhere are attracted to that. They fact they are made to feel not only welcome, and part of something big, but that they are an integral, and important part of that group.

I think that's very simplistic, it has to be more than that. It's part of being human to want to fit in, we have evolved to be pack animals. But there will always be people who are on the outside looking in because as society has progressed and got bigger and busier the community ties have got thinner. I think that we are more alone now than we ever have been. But that doesn't mean that we want to cut people's heads off because other people are cutting people's heads off.

I think that young people always want to rebel, it's a rite of passage. When I was young rebelling was getting stoned and shagging anyone with a pulse.

Some young people are drawn to war...for the excitment...the living on the edge... Now a days they are joinging ISIS whereas in the past they probably ran away to join the French Foreign Legion.
In WW1 and WW2 teenage boys in their droves put their age up so that they could enlist and get the chance to kill people.

These days the war based killing of people has got far more brutal, though I'm not even all that sure about that, WW2 was pretty bloody brutal.

These young muslem are brainwashed by their church in much the same way that the Christians were brainwashed to go on their crusades. History just keeps repeating itself over and over and over again.

hmmm maybe I should have e-mailed this comment and enlarged upn my theme
twicet
Oct. 25th, 2014 11:45 pm (UTC)

Much as we may want there to be some other reason……for there to be something we can grab hold of, and say “this is it” I really don’t think there is. In individual cases there will be different circumstances as to why one person has become disenfranchised, but if a person is well rounded has a sense of who they are, with a reasonable moral compass, it would be much harder to radicalize them.


Sure they may wander off the path, and try different things even get into trouble, that is part of the growing up process, but there will be lines they won’t cross. For most of them, while they may not always want it, they belong to some community, be it school, a group of friends with similar interests, strong family ties, there is something that they know they are a part of, they belong.


In almost every case those who become radicalized, have a history of being a loner, not belonging to anything. When they are identified the history unfolds, Loner, distanced from family and friends. Then comes the conversion, the belonging to something which gives meaning to their lives, even if they remain a loner they now have meaning to their existence, they count, they are important. The problem is they become fanatical in their belief system. And by that stage I’m not sure there is much that can be done to change their views.


What I see is a need to identify those who are in danger while they are still young enough, to be helped to form a bond with others, and have a sense of self-worth that is not based on a fanatical belief. Or in the case of those who may be developing a mental illness that that is recognized and treated.


I don’t have all the answers, but each of these people who have been radicalized, seem to fall into one of two categories, either they are the loner, disenfranchised type, or they have some degree of mental illness, in either case there is always someone looking for such a person to set them on that path of fanaticism.


lab_jazz
Oct. 27th, 2014 11:34 am (UTC)
Then comes the conversion, the belonging to something which gives meaning to their lives, even if they remain a loner they now have meaning to their existence, they count, they are important.

Your belief system is strongly a part of who you are, you can't get a belief system simply by being made to feel welcomed by a group. There has to be more to it than that. Unless of course they are only pretending to believe, just going along with it for the ride because the other passengers are interesting people who are hell bent on doing exciting things.

Over here we had people on the T.V., mainly spokespeople from the Muslim community who have said that their youth feel that they aren't accepted in mainstream Australia, that they are marginalised and disfranchised. That that is a big reason why they are drawn to anti-western fundamentalists.

That sort of thing gives me the screaming shits :( We have this problem because it's all our fault.... They should look closer into their own community and not be so quick to put the blame onto the rest of us.
twicet
Oct. 27th, 2014 07:18 pm (UTC)
Your belief system is strongly a part of who you are, you can't get a belief system simply by being made to feel welcomed by a group.

But our belief system is one we develop over time, it may even change as we get older, experience, different things. The people we are talking about are adrift, they have no belief system, until wham! they are hit by something which makes them feel they are part of something big, important, they are on the winning side.



In some cases they are not even member of this special group in person, they are loners, but they believe fanatically in what they are doing.



A lot of these youths are marginalized, or disenfranchised, but that is where they need to be identified and helped, not left to there own devices if they are, the result is rarely a good one.



I think the saying 'It takes a village to raise a child' has never been needed more than it is now.




lab_jazz
Oct. 28th, 2014 01:03 pm (UTC)
But our belief system is one we develop over time

I'm not so sure about that. I think that a lot of it is acquired from a young age; as in that famous Jesuit saying "Give me a child until he's seven and I'll show you the man".

I think the saying 'It takes a village to raise a child' has never been needed more than it is now.

But alas it's less likely now than it has ever been.

These days not even the child's parents raise them. It's the norm these days for babies from the age of 6 months to be put into long day care where they spend the majority of their waking hours being raised by a succession of poorly trained, poorly paid seventeen year olds.

One would have thought that Muslim families would be a stronger family unit with the majority of mothers being SAHM, and with them also having a more robust extended family and strong community ties.

If they can't help their own youth I don't see how the rest of us can.

How's "The Unpersuadables: Adventures with the Enemies of science" going?

I know that I owe you a letter; I'll write soon.

Hugs you

twicet
Oct. 29th, 2014 02:03 am (UTC)
I would agree that some of our belief system may be formed in our early years, but think a lot of that can change over the years, I know mine has. Funnily enough that was one of the topics when the six of us got together in Scotland!

The village has expanded for sure, all the more important that those involved in the care of children and youths that they are aware when kids are different.

My two both had a number of friends who are Muslim, some mothers worked, some didn't.

We had a number of kids who stayed with us at different times for one reason or another. We were lucky in that our two were fairly open with us, no subject was off the table, but I am sure we didn't know everything. Sometimes an outsider can see the picture with more clarity.

I haven't started "The Unpersuadables" yet, but it is near the top of the list!

No rush on the mail:)

*hugs you back*